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Children’s Health | Diet & Nutrition | Family Health | Men’s Health | Wellness | Women’s Health
The 4 types of seeds you can eat to keep you healthy (infographic from Cleveland Clinic)

4 Seeds You Need (Infographic)

Tips for using chia, flax, sunflower and sesame

Munch, crunch…seeds aren’t just fun to eat. They’re healthy in a surprising number of ways! Below are the four seeds I recommend to my patients to boost their nutrition.

The 4 types of seeds you can eat to keep you healthy (infographic from Cleveland Clinic)

Tags: healthy diet, infographic, seeds, snacks
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Laura Jeffers, MEd, RD, LD, is a registered dietitian and Outpatient Nutrition Manager in the Center for Human Nutrition.

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  • rah54drp49

    There are some errors in the nutritional information listed. The calorie count for flaxseed can’t be correct (3.74 for one tablespoon) as well as the fat content for sunflower seeds of 45 grams for one tablespoon.

    • hubteam

      Thank you for pointing out the error in the number of calories per tablespoon in flaxseed. We have corrected the post to read 37.4 calories. The amount of fat in sesame seeds is listed correctly. That is why we advise readers to use sesame seeds as an accent.

    • Health Hub Team

      Thank you for pointing
      out the error in the number of calories per tablespoon in flaxseed. We have
      corrected the post to read 37.4 calories. The amount of fat in sesame seeds is
      listed correctly. That’s why we advise readers to use sesame seeds as an accent.

      • rah54drp49

        Thank you for the prompt reply to my posting. I still think there is an error in the listing for sesame seeds. How is it possible to have 45 grams of fat in 1 T (one tablespoon) of sesame seeds? Olive oil has 14 grams for a tablespoon and I think that is pure fat. I have a booklet titled Nutritive Value of Foods published by the government (old copy from 1981) and it lists sesame seeds as having 45 calories and 4 grams of fat for one tablespoon. It has been my understanding that fat has nine calories per gram and at the listing of 45 grams per tablespoon that would equal 405 calories and not the 172 as listed in this article.

        • Health Hub Team

          Thank you for your keen eye and persistence. We’ve looked at this with a fresh set of eyes and have adjusted the decimal point in question. We appreciate your thoughtful and civil response.
          Sincerely,
          HealthHub Team

  • Gma25

    Isn’t the latest info from the medical experts that seeds, popcorn, nuts, etc, were now thought to be okay for those with diverticulosis. (Of course, not if you have active diverticulitis)

  • lonestar40

    I tired to print the info on seeds but only part of one page would print. Can you post or send a print-friendly page(s)?

  • chalogsdon

    I tried to copy this article on “Seeds” and it kept making 6 copies of page 1, even though it said that it had made 1 copy of each page. Is it my printer or just not a printer friendly article?

    • jim

      got the same problem. trying to figure out how to go around it.
      will let all know if successful.

  • sarahlevinesimon1

    I would like to have information on the effect of seeds on estrogen levels. Am told that flax will raise estrogen so would be contraindicated in breast cancer. Allegedly chia seeds lower estrogen levels. Would appreciate information. Sarah

  • Wondering

    Are these seeds digested ? I always thought they would just pass on thru. :)

    • sam wc

      Flaxseeds need to be grounded for digestion, and then stored in refrigerator to prevent rancidity as recommended Dr Michael Greger @ nutritionfacts.org.

  • Bonnie Huber

    I love to eat seeds and nuts

  • Sue S.

    From your own article “Diverticular Disease: Greatest Myths and Facts (by Meagan Costedia, MD 3-18-14) ”

    “Myth 1: If you have diverticular disease, you should avoid eating nuts, seeds and popcorn
    Fact: This most persistent myth actually contradicts advice
    doctors give for preventing the condition in the first place. A healthy,
    high-fiber diet is actually the best medicine against diverticulitis,
    and seeds and nuts certainly fit the bill.
    We used to think that a seed or nut plugged the pocket in the colon,
    and that’s what caused it to become inflamed or to rupture. But no
    surgeon has ever seen that, and studies have strongly suggested there’s
    nothing to that idea.”
    The above article states the opposite. I don’t know about Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, but I’ve had a couple rounds of diverticulitis which resulted in hospitalization. After meeting with one of your GI doctors, who suggested a high fiber diet (including seeds and nuts), I haven’t had any problems. It’s incredibly frustrating to get such 2 such diametrically opposed views from experts.

  • Linda Nelson-Laird

    Will Chia seeds stick in intestines like raspberry can? Diverticulitis?

    • HealthHubTeam1

      Registered Dietitian, Laura Jeffers, recommends “avoiding all
      seeds and skins with diverticulitis. Chia seeds are on that list.”

      Laura Jeffers, MEd, RD, LD
      Digestive Disease Institute
      Department of Nutrition Therapy

      To make an appointment please call 216.444.3046 or toll-free
      at 800.223.2273, ext. 43046, or visit us online at http://www.clevelandclinic.org/nutrition