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Cleveland Clinic News Wire | Family Health
When Caregivers Become Patients

When Caregivers Become Patients (Video)

From shocking diagnosis to purpose renewed

Imagine you work in the health care industry: You have the knowledge. You make the rules. Until one day you yourself experience a major health problem. Suddenly, everything changes.

Now, you’re the patient in the bed. You’re the one who’s helpless and dependent. That’s what happened to the health care workers in this video. The doctors, nurses and caregivers featured here learned firsthand what it’s like to be a patient. It started with a shocking diagnosis. They spent weeks in a bed. They wondered if this day, or the next, would be their last.

Hear their stories, and find out how they coped. See how these dedicated caregivers emerged from their ordeals with a sense of empathy and purpose renewed.

Want More? Watch Empathy: Exploring Human Connection

In this creative, emotionally stirring interpretation of what it means to have empathy, you will be taken through a hospital with the ability to see people’s thoughts and feelings. Watch: Empathy: Exploring Human Connection (Video)

 

Tags: caregivers, empathy, healthcare reform, patients, video
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  • http://www.myheartsisters.org/ Carolyn Thomas

    Beautifully done – as impactful as your empathy video. Bravo, everybody at C.C.

  • Indah Sukmawati

    Hi, I’m indah a cardiology resident from Indonesia. Thank you for your beautiful videos. Your motto: every life deserves world class care, is one of the things that remind me why I do what I do. Hopefully someday I can visit or study at your clinic.

  • Deborah Davis

    Thank you so much for tis video! I have not been a patient with a catostrphic diagnosis, but have been a patient a few times in the hospital. I am a nurse and try very hard to see things from the patient’s point of reference. It does not hurt to say a kind word, give a gentle caring touch or ask is there somwthing else “I” can do for you to make world of difference to that patient. I hope that everyone that reviews this video stops to examine who they are as a person…remember..it could be you in that bed.How do you want to be treated?

  • Kathy Hiller

    Very humbling video. Reminds me of why I became a nurse. I have been on the other end as well as a pt and can relate. Thank you!