Coronary Artery Disease | Heart & Vascular Health
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Beware the Silent Heart Attack

Pay attention to unusual heart symptoms

While a vast majority of people will have a heart attack with traditional symptoms (chest discomfort or pain, cold sweat, extreme weakness), there is a subgroup of people, around 20 to 30 percent, who will have atypical symptoms or no symptoms at all. It is most common for women and people with diabetes to have atypical heart attack symptoms, but it can happen to anyone. 

What are these unusual symptoms?

Some of the non-classic symptoms include unexplained fatigue, shortness of breath and/or discomfort in the throat, neck, jaw or a single extremity. Other patients will experience what feels like heartburn, and they will simply take medication to relieve the heartburn instead of recognizing that the pain could be coming from their heart.

Cleveland Clinic Cardiologist Curtis Rimmerman, MD, says people think a heart attack should be pain on the left side of the chest, but it is most often not a sharp pain, but rather discomfort felt in the center of the chest with a squeezing or tightness. Given the way television and movies portray a heart attack as an obvious event, it is not surprising that these less common symptoms can pass without being noticed as a heart attack.

Discovering the heart attack

Patients who have had an unrecognized heart attack may come to the doctor weeks or months after the event to find out about it. It is often recognized on the EKG during the patient’s yearly physical. “We can tell the size of the heart attack by how much heart muscle has been damaged, often by an electrocardiogram and even more precisely with a cardiac ultrasound known as an echocardiogram,” says Dr. Rimmerman.

Other patients will visit their doctors soon after an unrecognized heart attack because they are experiencing persistent symptoms such as fatigue and shortness of breath. In some cases, this can result from mitral valve leakage or other structural heart complications caused by scarring of the heart muscle from the heart attack. Serious developments can follow, including decompensated heart failure, heart rhythm disorders and a loss of consciousness.

Do not ignore odd signs

“People who experience a heart attack without recognizing it and survive are very fortunate,” Dr. Rimmerman says. “If you feel sustained discomfort for a period of a few minutes, especially if the symptoms are new and without clear explanation, you should not ignore these concerns.”

Often people sense that something is wrong, but they do not want to believe it is a heart attack. They ignore symptoms or attribute them to something else. There was a recently documented case in which a patient thought he was experiencing food poisoning only to find out a couple of days later that he had, in fact, had a heart attack.

If you have new onset heartburn-like symptoms or any of the above symptoms, you should seek care. “If it turns out to be heartburn, at least you have excluded something less threatening,” he says. “Don’t let uncertainly lead to regret later for you or your family.

The bottom line is “you should not be your own physician,” warns Dr. Rimmerman. “If you experience a distinct change in how you feel, no matter how subtle, you should seek medical attention.” 

Tags: heart and vascular institute, heart attack, heart disease, heart health
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  • Fernando Domeniconi

    Mine was exactly like that, I had mild pain in the center of the chest for over a week (it was not a heart attack then, I was told it was only angina), the EKG came out normal until a day that I felt a strange feeling of doom (cannot find a better way to describe it) so I went to the ER and I was having the heart attack. Luckily, it was a minor one, no damage to the heart, but I have a stent.

  • Linda Sarangoulis

    Good article – however, I’ve been dealing with these exact symptoms for close to 20 years. I’ve had every test (including those mentioned) – multiple times. I see my cardiologist yearly (or more as needed)… Fernando mentioned a, “feeling of doom”… I know exactly what you mean – and you’re correct. I get chest pain, pain in my arm and jaw, and feel like my heart just isn’t in a good place. No other way to describe it. I have gone to the ER – just to be told I didn’t have a heart attack (good news)…but when you have these symptoms – you just want to know what is causing it – and FIX it!

    • Mona a

      It is funny, that I hate to say it but I am not alone.

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      Linda – even though you have been checked out in the emergency room – I would suggest an appointment with a cardiologist for a second opinion. Perhaps a women’s cardiovascular center. If heart causes are truly ruled out then other causes can be explored – http://my.clevelandclinic.org/services/heart/disorders/coronary-artery-disease/causes-chest-pains .

      • tom Blatchley

        I had a heart attack on July 19,2014 but this was my second in 6years, yet symptoms were none like I thought as I went into a freezing like. Teeth chattering , the I have cold so I started to breath hard. My wife after a few hours got me up and took me to DR. Found out as the put in 3 stents. Said I had less then 15 min of Time left. That was close, and scared the crap out of me.

  • Pamela Savage Martin

    If I went to the hospital every time I have had chest pains, weakness, feeling of doom. I would be there every night. How do you know when to go. There are nights I am sure it’s a heart attack, pain in the arm etc.. so horrible not knowing what to do and fearing you will die on your sleep.

    • Marjorie

      I went in for my annual check-up with my internist (who is very thorough) and was told that I had had a silent heart attack and my EKG showed it. It had happened 2 or 3 years before (I know, I skipped check-ups for 2-3 years!, my bad). So I was freaked because I could not tell you at what point I even thought I had one. I am prone to anxiety attacks so I deal with the symptoms and move on. Dr suggested a heart cath to look for blockage and the results showed very little in one and none in the others. Worrying about it gives me anxiety so I guess I will live with this and maybe someday die in my sleep! Could be worse ways to go!!

      • The_Beating_Edge_Team

        Hi Marjorie – make sure that you are managing your risk factors (don’t smoke, exercise, eat right, keep your blood pressure, blood sugar and lipids in control) – this will decrease your risk for further progression of heart disease.

      • Elizabeth Brown

        I had a non invasive heart Cath, because my Mother had complications from one, I asked for non invasive. My heart was fine, but they found a small calculus deposit. I don’t remember the name of the procedure.

        • The_Beating_Edge_Team

          there are non-invasive procedures that look at calcium in the arteries – but unfortunately – the only gold standard procedures to truly see coronary blockage at this time is the cardiac cath. betsyRN

          • Elizabeth Brown

            Really, well the test took 3 hours, came up with a dianoses, so they do have a test, I just don’t remember the name of it! Contact Baptist East or South Hospital in Montgomery, Alabama!

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      That is a hard question to answer. The first step is to be evaluated when you are having those symptoms and see what the testing shows – if you are having a heart attack. Even if your emergency room (ER) tests comes back negative, it is important after that ER visit, to see a cardiologist for further evaluation. Then….. if all cardiac causes are ruled, out, it would be important to be evaluated for other causes of chest pain – http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/disorders/cad/causes-chest-pains.aspx .But – to answer your question, it is always best to be safe rather than sorry. So before all heart disease is ruled out – get checked when you have symptoms. betsyRN

    • Beckster

      Pamela, I am a cardiac RN! In answer to your question on how or when to know when you should go seek help: it is always error on the side of caution! Get checked out, they can do blood tests and EKG, then you will know!! There are other diagnosis that can cause those feelings too, it is best to let your doc check it out!!!

      • Christye

        My husband is in the hospital right now ecg.was normal and the blood enzymes test. Waiting on heart cath now after a medicine stress test.

    • Trying to be helpful

      You sound exactly like my boyfriend. Please consider that you may have an anxiety disorder. See your doctor.

    • lucyh

      I know what you mean. I have asthma and acid reflux and I get anxiety attacks. I have chest pain, discomfort, shortness of breath and cold sweats several times a week. I have often thought that I could easily have a heart attack and never know it.

  • shweta

    Yesterday my grandmother is suffering from major heart attack…. Last month she was suffering from minor heart attack… What can I do know

  • Lew

    I had a major MI with 100% block in my LAD. Hollywood has done us all a major disservice to dramatize heart attack symptoms. I never felt pain. Just profuse sweating and dizziness. If I had been working out I would have put it down to working out too hard. For those of us who are silent ischemics get to know your limits and your signs. Push the limits to recover your strength but never forget the signs.

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      Thank you Lew for sharing this.

  • Ursula

    My internist at a Cleveland Clinic facility in a Southwest suburb of Cleveland never picked up on anything even though I did mention the tightening in the chest & fatique and several other symptoms. Last November I contacted him with a problem that was becoming very troublesome and painful, he sent me to a facility in an northeastern suburb to see a nurse practitioner in their walk in clinic. Closer to home for me. She did not listen to my symptoms, description of pain or location of pain. She treated me very badly, like a stupid, unclean and annoying old woman. Luckily a few days later after insistence by my daughter and husband I went to the emergency room at Euclid hospital. They found the problem within 2 hours, had a procedure the next day, was in the hospital almost a month and they saved my life. Needless to say, I now have new doctors. Still within the Cleveland Clinic system but they listen. To all doctors reading this, stop treating women, especially older ones, like foolish alarmists and listen to us. We may not be pretty any longer but we are still worth helping.

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      Thanks for your note Ursula. I am glad you were persistent in your quest for care. Sometimes we need to be our own health care advocate. If you have a doctor that does not listen – you need to find another doctor and I am glad you have found that. Let us know if you have any questions in the future. betsyRN http://www.clevelandclinic.org/heartnurse

    • guest

      I was treated the same way, very rude and unconcerned Cardiologist.

    • Eric Serlin

      Hi Ursula, in my opinion this incompetent RN should have been brought up on charges of gross negligence!

    • Nancy Krystofik

      That is exactly what happens, love what you said about not pretty anymore, I have and do feel the same way when seeking help.

  • Metzmar

    This is not helpful and frankly, a little bit ridiculous. The entire population can’t run to the emergency room every time they experience heartburn or a pain in an extremity. The cost would be enormous. It would fill emergency rooms with nonemergencies and potentially delay care to those who need immediate care.

    • http://www.danaseilhan.com Dana

      They said “new onset heartburn symptoms,” as in you have never had heartburn before. They didn’t say go every time you have it. And oftentimes when we have pain in extremities we can point to a reason why. Presumably whoever wrote this article means to get it checked out if you *can’t* identify why you’re suffering extremity pain. That OK with you? You want to know what’s really expensive? Open-heart surgery.

      • Elizabeth Brown

        Amen, expensive and takes mos. of recovery to feel like your old self again!

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      Metzmar – people who experience chest pain – until heart is ruled out need to be evaluated. The guidelines from the AHA and ACC recommend evaluation and calling of 911 or chest pain lasting longer than 5 minutes – http://my.americanheart.org/professional/StatementsGuidelines/Statements-Guidelines_UCM_316885_SubHomePage.jsp . Once heart causes are ruled out for symptoms, then one can proceed at a more leisurely pace. In addition, research has noted that for those who are discharged from the ED after an evaluation for chest pain, who follow up with their physician, have better outcomes – http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/127/13/1386.short
      betsyRN

  • Regina Thompson Reighard

    I’ve been having occasional sweats you’d think I was having hot flashes but went thrum that 30 years ago. This has been happening only the past week and I am in AC.. and I mean sweat. No other symptoms.

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      If you are having new symptoms such as sweating – a good place to start would be with your family doctor or primary care doctor. There are actually many causes for this – and it should be evaluated. Here is a good page that may be helpful to you – http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003218.htm

  • http://www.danaseilhan.com Dana

    When I was first old enough to imbibe alcohol legally, I developed a fondness for daquiris. That got nipped in the bud as I figured out I had to be careful with the fruity drinks because I reacted badly to a few of them. I was at a bar one evening with friends and developed unpleasant chest symptoms where I felt squeezed and couldn’t fill my lungs as fully when I breathed. I went outside to get fresh air and eventually it wore off. I also had that experience a time or two with wine coolers so I began avoiding them too. Reading about the symptoms here makes me wonder a little, but I was in my early 20s at the time and I have never had anyone tell me since then that my heart sounded funny in any way. No idea. (I’m 40 now.)

  • Windy

    My Daughter is 24 and has a pacemaker. She has been having pain for two days in her left arm. I feel so sorry for her. She is on so many medications. When she calls her Doctor he acts like she is just a worry wart. What should I do?

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      Windy – your daughter should be evaluated for her left arm pain by her cardiologist or primary care provider. It can be caused by many things, but if this is a new symptom, and she is uncomfortable, she should be evaluated. Here is a link to symptoms of coronary artery disease – http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/disorders/cad/cadsymptoms.aspx ; if it is in the same side as the pacemaker, there may be issues with the pacemaker generator placement putting pressure on a nerve or circulation; or, it may not be related to the heart condition at all – but may be related to nerve, muscle or circulation in that arm – in any case, she should see her doctor. betsyRN

  • Sunny

    wow – nervous reading this – I had pain in the middle of the chest and jaw hurts – went away – should I have gone to the er

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      If it lasts longer than 5 minutes – yes. If not – then you should schedule a visit with your doctor to talk about these new symptoms. betsyRN

  • Mia

    Wish I could afford to go to the doctor for basic care let alone run there every time something seemed amiss.
    Insurance is expensive and the copayment is ridiculous. Non insured get to suffer and die faster, I suppose. America.
    Home of the brave.

    • J

      Suppose you’d rather have me pay for it.

      • Janet

        You are a horrible person to say something like that!

        • Cindy

          I agree with Janet you are a horrible person J to ever say such a thing to anyone. It just may someday be you walking in those shoes, or your child or your grandchildren! Shame on you .You should go and get checked out to see if you “HAVE A HEART”!!
          Cindy

    • Diann

      I had the experience of getting kicked out of an emergency room told my chest pain was not an emergency and I needed to see a shrink. By the way I have had a previous heart attack and four stents. The uninsured are expected to go die quietly. I however refuse to fall on my sword. When I had my heart attack I was left in the waiting room with debilitating chest pain and vomiting non stop. My first ekg and cardiac enzymes were negative. When my husband tried to get help for me he was told Sir she is not having a heart attack. But I was and came very close to dying. Don’t let arrogant Doctors intimidate you. This was a major heart hospital in Houston. You are important to God so don’t let jerks like that get to you.

  • Mary

    I was just shopping and all of a sudden my upper back and chest started hurting, the chest eased up than my left side started, than left side eased up and chest started along with the upper back pain and jaw area started. Went to sit down and it all went away. Lasted for about 5 mins total. Came home and left arm felt a little sore but, no longer. I have called dr but, in meantime what are your thoughts on this? Thanks in advance.

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      Mary – you need to be evaluated as soon as possible. If this discomfort returns in any of the locations, or you begin to have other symptoms such as shortness of breath, dizziness, extreme fatigue, or the symptoms listed at http://my.clevelandclinic.org/services/heart/disorders/cad/cadsymptoms, please seek emergency treatment. Your pain is very suspicious of heart pain. Even if it does not come back, you need to see your doctor for an evaluation. betsyRN

  • Ambivalent

    I had hard pain in the middle of my chest and got light headed. It brought me to my knees in the middle of the kitchen and lasted for a few minutes. Afterward I called and left a message for a nurse, she left a phone message saying to go if it was pain that didn’t stop. (I am uninsured, for this and other reasons, don’t want to go to an emergency room if I don’t have to.) I feel tired after, but not much else.

  • Shirley

    Having same issues as many I have read here. I was completely ( heart )checked out last summer and came out in top physical condition. But this past wk-end I had symptoms and couldn’t figure out if it was bad pizza , that ended up being a stomach bug ..had pain under my left rib that was relieved by belching up air. This lasted from midnight till 4 am. On monday started having nausea, belching , lightheadedness and fatigue ( stress? ) and my left arm is aching ( get that when I sleep on my arms. ) Am still having symptoms of a stomach bug ( this is saturday ). I also in the last several years have made my trips to the ER thinking it was my heart. Fine…each time. How do I know when it really is my heart .

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      Shirley – that is a tough one – and if you called our nurse line and had symptoms of chest discomfort, with lightheadedness and nausea and left arm pain – I would send you to the emergency room – because it is ALWAYS best to be safe than sorry. When you have continued symptoms – you should contact your doctor – he or she may want to check you out in any case to make sure it is in fact a stomach bug. Sometimes, especially as a woman ( we can have non-traditional symptoms), it is hard to tell. betsyRN

  • Roxana Celestina

    If you feel discomfort in your chest in 90% of the cases is due to gastric problems and your stomach top ring. Try a few forced burbs from your through and then you will remember me. DO NOT TRUST THE DOCTORS. MOST OF THEM ARE EMPLOYED TO MAKE MONEY FOR THE INSTITUTIONS WHICH EMPLOYS THEM. Give it a go and you will not be stented or duped to take their medication prescribed with tricks in the sleeves by them. And the secret is to eat less and have a good digestion.

  • Heather

    I have panic disorder, and I thought it was a safe thing to do to go see a cardiologist to make sure it wasn’t my heart when I get chest pains, etc. So he gave me a nuclear stress test, ekg, and echo. All tests normal. It put my mind at ease . I had all these tests done in Dec 2014. Now I know for sure it’s not my heart at all its my muscles tightening from a panic attack. Better be safe then sorry.

  • Barbara Rucker

    I have severe shortness of breath with exertion such as bending over or lifting something heavy from the floor. Sometimes I’m caught at the grocery store lifting a ten pound bag of sugar up,into my cart, and I had to have help to the front of the store and sit while they brought my cart to the front and checked me out. I nearly went to the ER. My doctors, I seen two, don’t seem to take me seriously, even though I keep telling them how severe this is and I’m really concerned. I’m sixty-seven years old. Normal weight, never smoked, but my husband did. What should I do??? I’m limited and stay home because of this.

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      Barbara – shortness of breath with exertion and decreased exercise tolerance (less ability to do activities) are signs you need to be evaluated for possible heart disease. Have you had a cardiovascular evaluation or testing such as EKG, echocardiogram or stress testing? If your doctor is not listening to your symptoms, you may need to get a second opinion.

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      Barbara – we just started a new facebook group for women with heart disease to discuss questions, diagnostic tests, condtions, treatments and heart healthy living topics – you may be interested – https://www.facebook.com/groups/womenshearthealth/

  • k93

    Well if I could afford to pay my 5,600.00 deductible, I might not worry about going if I needed to. Unfortunately, the cost of the bill would probably make me have a heart attack if I didn’t already have one. I work for a medical insurance company. A typical ER visit with diagnostic testing such as an EKG would run you maybe about $5,000.00.. And that’s on the low end. If you are lucky enough to have a copay plan now days, enjoy it. It’s soon to be a thing of the past due to the effects of our wonderful Obamacare.

  • Janet

    Yes people need to recognize these vague symptoms but doctors need to recognize them also. Especially if the patient is a woman and young. When I was 32, I had a heart attack. The symptoms were only a cold sweat and nausea and a feeling like I couldn’t catch my breath. My brother rushed me to emergency where I was told I was having an anxiety attack, given a shot of Visteril and sent home! So doctors BE AWARE !

  • Buckeyelin

    I had shortness of breath. It persisted so I had a stress test which luckily was normal. It turned out my thyroid was bad. It was removed and I had the same symptoms until the replacement thyroid meds kicked in. I wish someone could have picked up on this and saved me anxiety and time. All within the Cleve Clinic system. How was I supposed to know it was a symptom of hypothyroidism. PLUS Hasimoto thyroid disease is in my records. The doctors should know this symptom. I am not a medical professional.

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      Symptoms of hyopthyroid are listed at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/hypothyroidism.html They can be rather general and be the same symptoms as many other conditions. Sounds like your doctors were ruling out more serious causes of shortness of breath such as cardiac and other more common causes first. Glad you are feeling better. betsyRN

  • Coleycow

    I’m 15 years old and suffering from anxiety bouts. A similar event occurred last year, and we found it was linked to P.A.N.D.A.S, yet I wasn’t given a sure fire plan as how to take care of my heart. I want to get better but my anxiety keeps getting the best of me. I’d like some help taking care of my body.

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      Coleycow – you sound like you do need to talk to your doctor about an all around plan of exercise, diet, relaxation and support. If you are in the Cleveland area – we do have programs such as that through the Cleveland Clinic – your doctor should know about programs like that near you? good luck. betsyRN

  • Chiqueta

    Have any of you that have experienced these symptoms (especially the fatigue) been put on medication, even if you haven’t been diagnosed with a problem?
    I am very overweight and have attributed my increasing fatigue to weight gain, however it seemed to get much worse in a very short space of time. In the past I have gone to the Dr. And ER several times for chest pain. All tests came back negative. I did have an irregular EKG for which they did a heart cath (my insurance wouldn’t cover the nuclear stress test) and that was normal. This was in 2009.
    Fast forward to recently, I get winded just walking to the bathroom. This is sometimes accompanied by pain in my neck and or chest pain. I sometimes have an upset stomach and gas afterwards. It doesn’t help that I have really bad gerd also. I went to see my cardiologist and he prescribed me nitro and just ordered some lab test.
    I took the nitro a few times but the last time I took it my heart started racing soon afterwards. I ended up calling 911 because I was convinced that I was having a heart attack. my heart rate had decreased by the time they got there. They hooked me up to a 12 lead and it was normal. I didn’t go to the hospital at that moment but ended up going to the emergency room later on because I as still kinda worried. They took blood and those tests came back normal.
    In the meantime I continued to work and go about my life as normal but the fatigue and pain was really stressing me out. My cardiologist didn’t seem to want to schedule another appointment with me and all I could do was talk to his nurse. He did end up scheduling me for a stress test that would take place a month later. I honestly felt like I could be dead by that time.
    I ended up going to the emergency room after work because I had a particularly bad day that day. They ran the standard tests which came back normal. They asked if I wanted to be admitted for further tests. I agreed because I really needed to speak with a cardiologist. They admitted me and I had an ultrasound the next day. This was normal so the cardiologist did a heart cath. This was also normal.
    My primary physician prescribed me propranolol and my cardiologist prescribed me amlodipine. These seems to help a bit with me being able to do more without getting winded so fast.
    This takes me back to my original question: if nothing is wrong with my heart, what is the medication for?
    I have been researching and learned about mvd. You can have blockages in the small arteries that lead to your heart without having blockages in your main arteries. From what I read, this cannot be diagnosed with a standard heart cath. Is this true? I Have shoulder pain which I cannot account for. I also have jaw/teeth pain but admittedly that could be due to tension as this whole business has me very stressed. I did mention the MVD in my follow up appointment with the cardiologist from the ER. He says that he would schedule me for an ultrasound. I had an ultrasound when they admitted me. Are there different types of ultrasounds for your heart? Also, can an ultrasound determine MVD? I was under the impression that it could not.

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      Chiqueta – are you saying MVD as in Mitral Valve Disease? That would be evident if you had an echocardiogram (ultrasound of your heart). there are other causes of chest pain – http://my.clevelandclinic.org/services/heart/disorders/coronary-artery-disease/causes-chest-pains – and shortness of breath. If all your heart tests are coming back normal – it may be time to go to your internist to investigate other causes. Talk to your doctor about possible causes and the next steps. betsyRN

  • Nancy Sciarrino

    Yes I know that go to hospital they ack like we faking that y people don’t do anything about it or if they know you something else is wrong and you have symptoms of heart attack they say it the other disease which it a heart problems

  • ellie

    Geez, I have been having more heartburn attacks in the past few weeks, I do have GERD and take meds and watch what I eat, guess I best find a better. PCP one that mists blows my symptoms and wants to farm you out to others and not do any tests at her office.

  • DeAnn Laube Payne

    I don’t really talk about my heart attack, not because I can’t but because I moved on and my heart disease doesn’t define me! However, since February is Women’s Heart Disease month and it is the number one killer of women, I thought I should pass on some of my symptoms prior to my heart attack, March 16, 2012. I was 40 when I started having problems and there was no heart disease in my immediate family. I was not overweight, normal blood pressure, high cholesterol and was a smoker. My symptoms were overlooked and dismissed by all the doctors I saw from local, to Richmond, to a week at the Mayo Clinic. I was dismissed because I was a female and only 40/41. My blood work was a complete mess and my other body systems were also effected. Yet, my body was screaming the warnings! Some main symptoms-
    Swelling in my feet and ankles 6+ months prior
    Fatigue like no other
    Out of breath
    Periods of bad “indigestion ”
    Blood pressure got a little high

    Night of heart attack- I had pain in my upper back, slight numbness/tingling down the back of both my arms, slight pain down right side of my jaw, and most horrible “indigestion/reflux” in the center of my chest. I laid with my hand on my chest from 1-7am and I never slept because of the pain. After I slept 3 hrs, I woke up and felt like I had the flu. I just didn’t feel well. I was lucky to survive because when I went to the hospital, 4 days later, and they were finally able to perform a heart catheterization, they found a 100% blockage, about 3″ long in my Right Coronary Artery and placed to heart stents. I never in a million years thought it was my heart! Why would I after none of the doctors I saw, thought so?! I only knew something was wrong! To all of my female friends, follow your gut not your head, when it comes to your body! And no matter what excuse you tell yourself if you think something is wrong, call 911! What’s the worse that can happen??? You save your own life! Stay healthy and get healthy!

  • Lydia Flynn

    5 years andI hcounting with heart issues. Stated with chest pain when I was exercising.Every test said i was fine. One dr said it was acid reflux. After 6 months of no improvement i went to a cacardiologist. After 6 different test they found a blockage in the LAD 80% blocked, put in a stent. I felt so much better. However, since then continued chest pain came back. I have seen Dr. Heupler at Cleveland. To see of he could determine why I was still having chest pain. He said I could not have artery spasms. My symptoms do not match his years of study. Did a heart cath and before he could add his fancy meds to diagnosis it, it happened. Spasms in my main artery. Something he says he has only seen 4 cases.
    Since then I have been to the Barbra Streisand Heart Clinic to see Dr Bairy-Mertz they only study women with heart issues. Boston Heart Clinic to see Dr Hutter and sent records to Houston Heart Clinic. All the meds and suggestions have not created any improvement in the chest pain.
    Today I no longer work and had to stop. Chronic Angina, shortness of breath, fatigue, arm and back pain . If my body thinks I have done to much I will sleep 15 or more hours a day. I do sleep a lot. I do not have high cholesterol or high blood pressure but I take meds for it, all my heart meds, verapamil, effient, amlodipine, asprin, zocor, omega 3. Presently I started having fainting spells. Tilt table test was positive with a noted trigeminy noted on the EKG when I passed out. I am lost in a world I do not understand. Before now I was in fantastic health never smoked active with kids and family. Now I can not do much with out issues. I go to the ER often, my frequent punch card is all full. Plus they can not help. I have burned out 4 Cardiologist. What they all can say is I have Coronary Artery Spasms with Ventricular Tachycardia in my main artery with Heart Block 1. I have Heart Desease due to the blockage of fat they found in the LAD. Any suggestions on how to manage or when to stop looking for a better plan. How will I know if I am having a real heart attack. Are there others with this strange mix and how do they manage. I know this is a lot. Any suggestions would be great.

    L

  • Alec Theora

    Work a brutally long day, get home late, eat way too much before bed (and some maybe questionable frozen soup). Sleep in an uncomfortable chair, then wake up with a belly ache and a sore upper back. Took Tums. I don’t even have a primary care doctor as yet since getting new Obamacare that didn’t include my old one. I have to work tonight and can’t call off. Gotta pay the bills. It takes so long to set up an appointment and get to a doctor, the helpful but useless advice to “go see your doctor” is an unreal task for many of us. If you’re feeling uncomfortable you can’t just pop in to the doctor and/or can’t sit all day at an emergency center (not to mention the high coinsurance payments for that kind of visit). The symptoms seem so vague that most will just ride it out and treat them, and wait and see.