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There are 7 important points you should know about cooking oils. Inforgraphic on HealthHub from Cleveland Clinic

Heart-Healthy Cooking: Oils 101

Keep this primer as a ready reference

Confused about which oils are heart-healthy and which aren’t? Health Hub asked for advice from James D. Perko, CEC, AAC, Executive Chef, for Cleveland Clinic’s Wellness Institute and Center for Lifestyle Medicine, and dietitians Katherine Patton, MEd, RD, CSSD, LD, and Julia Zumpano, RD, from the Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute’s Preventive Cardiology Program.

There are 7 important points you should know about cooking oils

Remember that oil is a fat, and fat calories are still fat calories, no matter which type of oil you use. So, you should use the least amount of fat possible to prepare your foods while still getting the greatest amount of taste and health benefits.

Use this guide to oils as you fix your favorite recipes. You might find it helpful to hang it inside a cupboard door as a quick and easy reference.

Variety might not be best

Although having lots of different oils in the kitchen might seem like a good idea, James Perko says that idea can backfire. As the bottles sit on the shelf, heat, light and air start to ruin them. You might be best off to choose one or two types and use them while they’re still fresh.

Know the smoke point

The smoking point is the temperature that causes oil to start smoking, which produces toxic fumes and harmful free radicals (the stuff we’re trying to avoid!). Different oils have different smoking points, due to their chemical make-up. This means some oils are better suited for cooking at higher temperatures than others. A good rule of thumb is that the more refined the oil, the higher the smoke point.

The smoke point only relates to fresh oil. If oil is used for cooking, then strained and re-used, it loses integrity.

Oils with a high smoke point

These oils are best for searing, browning and deep frying. Note: We do not recommend deep frying

Oil % Mono % Poly % Sat Nutrition Notes
Almond 65 28 7 Distinctive nutty flavor
Avocado 65 18 17 Sweet aroma
Hazelnut 82 11 7 Bold, strong flavor
Palm 38 10 52 High in saturated fat. Not recommended
Sunflower 79 7 14 Seek out high-oleic versions, which are higher in monounsaturated fat
“Light” olive/refined olive 78 8 14 The more refined the olive oil, the better its all-purpose cooking use. “Light” refers to color

 

Medium-high smoke point

Best suited for baking, oven cooking or stir frying.

Oil % Mono % Poly % Sat Nutrition Notes
Canola 62 31 7 Contains low levels of omega-3
Grapeseed 17 73 10 High in omega-6
Macadamia nut 84 3 13 Bold flavor
Extra virgin olive 78 8 14 Best-pick oil
Peanut 48 34 18 Great for stir frying

 

Medium smoke point

These oils are best for light sautéing, sauces and low-heat baking.

Oil % Mono % Poly % Sat Nutrition Notes
Corn 25 62 13 High in omega-6. High-oleic (monounsaturated fat) versions coming soon
Hemp 15 75 10 Good source of omega-3. Keep refrigerated
Pumpkinseed 32 53 15 Contains omega-3
Sesame 41 44 15 Rich, nutty flavor. Keep refrigerated
Soybean 25 60 15 High in omega-6
Walnut 24 67 9 Good source of omega-3
Coconut 6 2 92 High in saturated fat. Use in moderation

 

No-heat oils*

These oils are best for making dressings, dips or marinades.

Oil % Mono % Poly % Sat Nutrition Notes
Flaxseed 65 28 7 Excellent source of alpha-linolenic acid,
a form of omega-3
Wheat Germ 65 18 17 Rich in omega-6. Keep refrigerated

*Toasted sesame, extra virgin olive and walnut oils also work well.

Use oils wisely

It is important to choose the right oil for the job. It is also important to use the right amount of oil. Cooking is one of those things that people learn from their parents and grandparents. And while Grandma’s recipe may call for throwing the battered fish into a pot of oil, you will actually get a healthier, more flavorful meal by using less oil and pan-searing.

Unsaturated fats are best. They help round out a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, seeds and whole grains. Limit animal fats/saturated fats and completely avoid trans-fats whenever possible.

Perko says the final message is, “Love the foods that love you back!”

Tags: cooking, cooking oils, diet, heart and vascular institute, heart disease, heart health, heart-healthy oils, infographic, oils
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  • Wes

    Please reference where saturated fat, specifically lauric acid, in coconut oil has a negative effect on heart health. Harvard epidemiological research (lipids, 2010 Micha and Mozaffarian) actually shows a favorable impact of lauric acid on lipid profiles. Further, there seems to be no benefit of replacing saturated fat in the diet with carbohydrate; perhaps because all excess
    carbohydrate will be hapatically synthesized in to palmitate (saturated fat/butter fat), the only fatty acid directly synthesized in animals..

    • Health Hub Team

      Thank you for your questions/comments regarding coconut oil and saturated fats. In recent years, coconut oil has seen a boon in popularity, with many touting it’s health benefits (including and beyond cardiovascular health). Coconut oil is made up of about 90% saturated fat — 50% of which is indeed lauric acid. A few very small trials have indicated coconut oil may not have a detrimental effect on cholesterol and cardiovascular health. However, until larger, randomized controlled trials are conducted, we cannot recommend people substitute their current saturated fat food sources (or mono and polyunsaturated fats) with coconut oil. However, coconut oil can be included in small amounts in a heart healthy diet rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, lean proteins and unsaturated fats. Please keep in mind that one food product or dietary nutrient source is not going to be the key to optimal cardiovascular health: the overall diet and the foods/nutrients that make this up will have the greatest overall affect on cardiovascular health outcomes. At this point at the Cleveland Clinic we do not espouse coconut oil as a substitute for saturated, mono or polyunsaturated fats. Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats have been extensively studied are the current best known sources of substitution for saturated fats in the diet.
       
      That leads to your second question: carbohydrates as a substitute for saturated fats. About a decade ago and longer, we used to recommend carbohydrates as a substitute for saturated fats. While this does result in a reduction in LDL cholesterol, as the OmniHeart Trial showed, substituting lean protein (both from plant and animal sources) and unsaturated fats has the greatest overall positive impact on reducing LDL, raising HDL, lowering triglycerides, and lowering systolic and diastolic blood pressure.  
       
      I wish you the very best in your heart health endeavors. — Melissa Ohlson, MS, RD, LD

      • Wes

        Thank you for your response. My point was essentially what you stated in your reply… Too often patients are told to reduce the fat content of their diet, particularly saturated fat, which is a good idea, however they need to be accompanied by recommendations of what foods would be suitable replacements; for example, a patient is told to reduce saturated fat in his or her diet, so they select low fat ice cream loaded with extra sugar and sodium. In the end, it is unlikely that they minimized their cardiometabolic disease risk, or ameliorated it in anyway; perhaps even caused more harm.

  • Guitar Jungle

    According to Doctor Caldwell Esselstyn of the Celeveland Clinic, who studied heart disease causes for many years; no oil is acceptable as far as heart disease goes. Why the disrepancy in your report?

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      The diet recommended in the Section of Preventive Cardiology is similar to the Mediterranean diet, which emphasizes, fruits, vegetables,  whole grains, legumes, fish and small amounts of mono and poly-unsaturated fats.  http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/prevention/askdietician/ask10_01.aspx .  This type of diet is also recommended by the American Heart Association http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/NutritionCenter/HealthyDietGoals/Healthy-Diet-Goals_UCM_310436_SubHomePage.jsp .  Dr. Esselstyn ‘s diet is very low in fat and originally focused on patients with existing heart disease.  Most healthy people aiming to lower their overall risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) do well on a Mediterranean dietary approach.  We are happy to support patients who choose the Esselstyn diet type, however, each patients individual nutrition needs vary, therefore we encourage patients to discuss dietary options with both their doctor and registered dietitian to ensure they are meeting their nutrition needs and controlling their risk factors for CVD.

  • ayesha

    Something is wrong with this report. Please kindly verify your source and check again the coconut oil. http://www.livestrong.com/article/399804-is-coconut-oil-high-in-saturated-fat/ – check this and other health articles.

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      The source is from the Coconut Research Center

    • Megan

      Are you serious in referencing Livestrong? That article you linked to was written by a personal trainer. Try to only read sources that are credible, such as peer-reviewed journals. Avoid Dr. Oz, Wikipedia, and blogs. Coconut oil is absolutely not healthy for the average person.

    • Fermin Cruz

      Livestrong is not a reliable source.

  • http://netahealth.org/ LiLLiPinay

    I just found this report. It would be nice if you had this chart as a downloadable pdf so people don’t have to print the entire web page.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1461785574 Tami Wilson

    Why no mention of rice bran oil? It has a high smoke point. And is becoming more widely available.

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      I checked with our Preventive Cardiology Nutrition Team – they thanked you for making them aware and said: For the time being there is little known about rice bran oil to recommend its
      use, especially when none of our dietitians have personally used it. However when more
      is known or comes out we will surely assess and update. betsyRN

  • prpty

    Why did Dr. Oz choose palm oil as one of his 2012 miracle favorites and Beating Edge does not recommend?

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      Dear prpty – thanks for your question. I found the article you are discussing at http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/why-you-should-give-red-palm-oil-try. It is important to first note that Dr. Oz is referring to Red Palm Fruit Oil – not the more commonly used Palm Kernel Oil. I asked our Preventive Cardiology dietitian Kate and she replied: it is not that we do not recommend this type of oil, but it is not a common enough oil to be found at the average store, nor does it appear to have enough conclusive evidence based research to support all its benefits that we would highly endorse it. Therefore, it would be fine to use in moderation as part of an overall heart healthy diet. betsyRN

  • Guest

    Not all saturated fats are created equal and only medium chain fats
    are good for you. People in the tropics primarily in Polynesia use
    coconut oil and have no signs of coronary heart disease–2 separate
    studies done in 1930s and 1981 . “Where were all the clogged arteries
    and heart attacks from eating all of this “evil” saturated fat?
    Obviously, coconut oil was doing nothing to harm the health of these
    islanders.” source:
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mobileweb/dr-mercola/coconut-oil-benefits_b_821453.html

    These are the things you get from ingestion of medium chain
    triglycerides also known as coconut oil:
    They resemble carbohydrate more than they do fat.
    They are water soluble and don’t require bile to break them down (no
    risk of forming gall stones).
    Because they down quickly, they are used as an immediate source of
    energy by the liver.

    Selling point:
    “In the 1980s MCTs became a popular source of energy for people
    engaged in high-level sports such as bikers or marathoners. High
    carbohydrate diets had been popular for providing quick energy, but
    carbs also stimulate insulin, which causes your body to deposit fat.
    MCTs provide quick energy as well, but since they are a fat and not a
    carb, they don’t stimulate insulin, and you don’t have the problem
    with weight gain. MCTs do stimulate thermogenesis, which is the
    process where your body produces heat by increased burning of fat.
    This is a good thing for people who are trying to lose fat.

    People who suffer from epileptic seizures have been shown to benefit
    from a diet high in MCTs. They also tend to lower blood sugar
    slightly, and this is beneficial for diabetics. They have been shown
    to be antioxidants and have anticoagulative effects, which can help
    with heart disease.”. Source http://thirdplanetfood.com/tidbits/?p=392

    Both Harvard Health Publication (2011) and PubMed (2004) shows that
    coconut oils lower LDL and increase HDL cholesterol levels. These are
    fairly new research done. How long have we been told to stay with
    unsaturated and polyunsaturated fats? People in areas of the world
    who use only if not mostly palm oil.

    Folks do your own research. You can listen to people–doesn’t matter what they do or who they are. In this day in age, take responsibility. Google and google some more until you find what you need.

  • http://twitter.com/WhiteSpir1t MobeDick

    Not all saturated fats are created equal and only medium chain saturated fats
    are better for your cardiovascular health. People in the tropics primarily in Polynesia use
    coconut oil and have no signs of coronary heart disease–2 separate
    studies done in 1930s and 1981 . “Where were all the clogged arteries
    and heart attacks from eating all of this “evil” saturated fat?
    Obviously, coconut oil was doing nothing to harm the health of these
    islanders.” source:
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mobileweb/dr-mercola/coconut-oil-benefits_b_821453.html

    Lauric acid “strengthens the immune system and is also found in human breast milk. Caprylic acid and capric acid are also present, contributing to coconut oil’s antifungal, antiviral and antibacterial properties.” “The health benefits are vast. Bruce Fife, ND, CN, author of “The Coconut Oil Miracle” has said “(Coconut oil) increases absorption of some of the B vitamins, the fat-soluble vitamins: A, D, E, K, beta-carotene, and some amino acids. Research has shown it can be useful in the treatment and prevention of obesity. A lot of research is current being done in this area. Studies show it may be helpful in preventing liver disease, kidney disease, Crohn’s disease, cancer and many infectious illnesses, such as the flu, herpes, bladder infections, and candida, to mention just a few.” source: http://www.livestrong.com/article/85285-coconut-oil-omega3/

    These are the things you get from ingestion of medium chain
    triglycerides also known as coconut oil:
    They resemble carbohydrate more than they do fat.
    They are water soluble and don’t require bile to break them down (no
    risk of forming gall stones).
    Because they down quickly, they are used as an immediate source of
    energy by the liver.

    Selling point:
    “In the 1980s MCTs became a popular source of energy for people
    engaged in high-level sports such as bikers or marathoners. High
    carbohydrate diets had been popular for providing quick energy, but
    carbs also stimulate insulin, which causes your body to deposit fat.
    MCTs provide quick energy as well, but since they are a fat and not a
    carb, they don’t stimulate insulin, and you don’t have the problem
    with weight gain. MCTs do stimulate thermogenesis, which is the
    process where your body produces heat by increased burning of fat.
    This is a good thing for people who are trying to lose fat.

    People who suffer from epileptic seizures have been shown to benefit
    from a diet high in MCTs. They also tend to lower blood sugar
    slightly, and this is beneficial for diabetics. They have been shown
    to be antioxidants and have anticoagulative effects, which can help
    with heart disease.”. Source http://thirdplanetfood.com/tidbits/?p=392

    Both Harvard Health Publication (2011) and PubMed (2004) shows that
    coconut oils lower LDL and increase HDL cholesterol levels. These are
    fairly new research done. How long have we been told to stay with
    unsaturated and polyunsaturated fats? People in areas of the world
    who use only if not mostly palm oil.

    Folks do your own research. You can listen to people–doesn’t matter what they do or who they are. In this day in age, take responsibility. Google and google some more until you find what you need.

  • http://twitter.com/WhiteSpir1t MobeDick

    Not all saturated fats are created equal and only medium chain fats
    are good for you. People in the tropics primarily in Polynesia use
    coconut oil and have no signs of coronary heart disease–2 separate
    studies done in 1930s and 1981 . “Where were all the clogged arteries
    and heart attacks from eating all of this “evil” saturated fat?
    Obviously, coconut oil was doing nothing to harm the health of these
    islanders.” source:
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mobileweb/dr-mercola/coconut-oil-benefits_b_821453.html

    These are the things you get from ingestion of medium chain
    triglycerides also known as coconut oil:
    They resemble carbohydrate more than they do fat.
    They are water soluble and don’t require bile to break them down (no
    risk of forming gall stones).
    Because they down quickly, they are used as an immediate source of
    energy by the liver.

    Selling point:
    “In the 1980s MCTs became a popular source of energy for people
    engaged in high-level sports such as bikers or marathoners. High
    carbohydrate diets had been popular for providing quick energy, but
    carbs also stimulate insulin, which causes your body to deposit fat.
    MCTs provide quick energy as well, but since they are a fat and not a
    carb, they don’t stimulate insulin, and you don’t have the problem
    with weight gain. MCTs do stimulate thermogenesis, which is the
    process where your body produces heat by increased burning of fat.
    This is a good thing for people who are trying to lose fat.

    People who suffer from epileptic seizures have been shown to benefit
    from a diet high in MCTs. They also tend to lower blood sugar
    slightly, and this is beneficial for diabetics. They have been shown
    to be antioxidants and have anticoagulative effects, which can help
    with heart disease.”. Source http://thirdplanetfood.com/tidbits/?p=392

    “Coconut oil increases your metabolism.

    Not only does coconut oil convert to energy quicker in your
    body, it increases your metabolism, which promotes weight loss. Because it
    boosts your metabolism, it helps your body burn fat more effectively.

    Coconut oil may triple your calorie burn. Since coconut oil
    is a MCT, it is converted to energy so quickly that it creates a lot of heat.
    In a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, MCT’s burn
    three times more calories for six hours after a meal than LCT’s.

    The February 15, 2005 issue of Woman’s World magazine stated
    that coconut oil is the “underground high-metabolism secret.”

    This is great
    news for people who have thyroid problems, since coconut oil improves sluggish
    thyroids by stimulating the production of extra thyroid hormones. Most other
    common oils, like vegetable (soy) and corn have been shown to inhibit thyroid
    function.” Source: http://www.streetdirectory.com/food_editorials/health_food/fruits/reasons_you_should_be_using_coconut_oil.html

    Both Harvard Health Publication (2011) and PubMed (2004) shows that
    coconut oils lower LDL and increase HDL cholesterol levels. These are
    fairly new research done. How long have we been told to stay with
    unsaturated and polyunsaturated fats?

    Folks do your own research. Google and google some more until you
    find what you need.

  • pavi

    Where is rice barn oil? no where in picture

  • http://www.facebook.com/bboop Leigh Combes Phillips

    I was surprised to see coconut oil “not recommended” when there has been a lot of new information suggesting that that is incorrect and it is actually very good for you. Who are we to believe? It is very confusing

    • http://www.facebook.com/loretta.hanes Loretta Hanes

      Leigh, go to the westonaprice.org website to get the correct and up to date info on nutrition! We’ll all be dead and in the ground before “registered dietitians” think we have enough proof! Notice too, that they are recommending GMO oils: canola, soy, corn

      • http://www.selfinfluence.net roddaut

        Canola oil is not GMO. The rapeseeds used in Canola were bred through traditional breeding techniques decades ago, just as all other plants we eat today were modified through breeding.

        • Stacy Branham

          Yes, the Canola plant was bred from the rapeseed & other mustard plants, which would be similar to creating a hybrid. We would not consider this modified. Less than 10 yrs ago, a large percentage of canola grown was genetically engineered to be herbicide tolerant. When we pick up a bottle of canola oil at the store we can be certain that it is a GMO oil.

    • Fermin Cruz

      “there has been a lot of new information suggesting that is incorrect and is actually very good for you” Did you obtain that information from a credible reliable source or did Dr. OZ said that on his show?

  • kim

    there are No health cooking oil…get a clue!

  • Recycle_Yer_Oil

    Which is the best Used Cooking Oil for Japanesse food. I have been trying to create my own fried rice for many a year, but it never turns out right. I hear sesame seed oil is the way to go, but it just never seems to work out.

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      I asked the dietitians and they suggested trying peanut oil.

      • Davey Pants

        PEANUT OIL is best for all wok cooking/fried rice, it has a very high smoke temp level so it won’t burn or smoke on you, it’s used by all chinese restaurants…and by Alton Brown:)

    • DantheMan

      I live in Japan, and on Rakuten (a popular one-stop shopping site similar to Amazon), the best selling oils are rapeseed (canola) oils.

  • Walt Willoughby

    I am truly amazed that this article recommends oils as part of a heart healthy diet. It is my understanding studies that find oil as heart healthy are based on population studies and contained no controls. The control studies I have heard about put olive oil as bad for your heart. In animal controlled studies I have seen and read oil
    contributed to the buildup of arterial plaque or heart disease. And in other controlled studies I have read olive oil contributed to the impairment of artery dilation that could lead to constrictions of the arteries and injure the endothelium and that contributes to heart disease. Are these controlled studies being ignored and if so why? I also found a contradiction in the article under fats at a glance — Saturated fats – Bottom line: the fewer the better. Less than 7 percent of your daily fat calories should come from saturated fats. Eliminate whole and 2 percent dairy, and limit red meat and other animal protein at meals (reduce frequency, portion size or both). But doesn’t olive oil contain 14% saturated fats. One last thing, the definition of
    junk food is food with empty calories. All oil, including olive oil is 100% fat calories with no other nutrients like fiber, protein, and carbs. So Olive would fit the definition of junk food. Those calories can be diluted by other foods but why even put junk food on healthy foods to dilute the healthy foods? And finally all oils, even olive oil, are dense in caloires from fat. When you include oil in your diet doesn’t that mean you are consuming a lot of fat and eating a lot of any kind of fat, including the so called healthier ones? This means you are eating a lot of calories. So doesn’t eating fat and consuming high calories lead to weight gain and obesity which leads to increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke, many forms of cancer and heart disease? Please explain your reasoning and please present your controlled studies that “prove” oil is heart healthy.

  • przemon

    Oil from Poland http://www.lniany.com.pl

  • jag

    http://www.kumc.edu/school-of-medicine/integrative-medicine/health-topics/healthy-cooking-oils.html
    I am so confused!
    Can you please respond to the claims made by the University of Kansas Medical Center website (above) that are in direct contradiction to your advice about healthy oils to cook with?? For example, they state you should NEVER heat canola oil.
    thank you so much.

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      Dear Jag, thank you for your note.

      These are the views of our Preventive Cardiology Nutrition Program dietitians:

      1. http://www.kumc.edu/school-of-medicine/integrative-medicine/health-topics/healthy-cooking-oils.html is discussing overall Healthy Cooking Oils, but not necesarily Healthy for Cardiovascular Health. The site is not really focusing on cardiovascular health.

      2. I would disagree with NEVER heating canola oil. I think they are suggesting NOT to heat it because you can lose some antioxidant and ALA, I’d say room temperature or warm is fine

      3. I typically advise against pan frying with olive or canola anyway – I don’t advise frying – certainly not in Lard or Ghee as they suggest. And…where are people suppose to find Ghee ??

      4. I suggest cooking spray a non- stick pan or a canola, corn or sunflower oil – if not high heat.

      On 11/18, our cardiovascular nutrition and exercise experts will be online to answer questions. See chat.clevelandclinic.org for more information.

      betsyRN

      • Jag

        I really appreciate your efforts and information. Really.

        But I must honestly say that as lay consumers, your distinctions are rather confusing. What is “healthy” vs. “healthy for cardiovascular health” should hardly be that different. And when consumers read such disparate views from different academic centers, we tend to throw our hands up in the air and ask, who knows what’s right??

        Jag

        • The_Beating_Edge_Team

          Here is the reply: we focus on reducing risk for the development and the treatment of cardiovascular disease, therefore cholesterol and saturated fat are significantly limited, in general health saturated fat may be eaten in less of a restriction where as other foods may need to be restricted or encouraged for treatment or prevention of other diseases specific to the patient medical and family history (DM, cancer, HTN, etc). Hope this helps to clarify the information.

      • Jag

        Again, the U of Kentucky site specifically states:

        Q: Is canola oil a good oil to use for cooking?
        A: No, canola oil should not be used for cooking.

        whereas, you list it above as good for oven-cooking and stir-frying.

        • The_Beating_Edge_Team

          Jag – our dietitians have described our view – you would need to contact the U of Kentucky if they do not agree with those views. betsyRN

        • Stacy Branham

          Jag, also interested in reading what U of Kentucky has to say about canola oil. Is there any quick way to find their information?

    • Stacy Branham

      jag, would love to read the article from UK Medical Center. When I click on the link it says it is unable to find the page. Please help, can you remember the name of the article you read?

  • Jerry

    According to Mercola.com Organic E.V.Coconut Oil and Extra Virgin Cold Pressed Organic Olive Oil are the best. I think he’s right . Dr. Mercola has the best Health Website in the World.

  • adamone

    just tried some new flaxseed cooking oil called Alligga at a cooking demo, high smoke point at 482F, nutty flavor high in omega3, they say its first of it kind. Tried it in a hot and cold infused hummus. It was delicious! Can’t wait for it to hit the market, I bought a bottle but I’ve used it almost everyday this week.

    • J

      scary, I would not cook with Flax no matter what the company does to it first, it is toxic when heated, period…there is always someone out to make money with a new bad idea

  • Clif

    would like to have seen rice bran oil here. it’s slowly working its way into the finer food service venues as a healthy alternative to the traditionals . With high smoke points at 232 °C (450 °F) Wikipedia specs:Rice bran oil has a composition similar to that of peanut oil, with 38% monounsaturated, 37% polyunsaturated, and 25% saturated fatty acids.

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      Thanks for the info. We did not list all oils. There are oils such as rice bran oil, which are not very commonly used therefore we did not include it. Our Preventive Cardiology dietitian confirmed it is acceptable. betsyRN

  • SandyK

    Hi! Thanks for all this great information. It’s difficult to discern with all the hype on the Internet. One question … I understand that avocado oil has one of the highest smoke points, possibly 510 degrees F. I’m curious why it is not listed in your chart for higher smoke point oils. Thank you!

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      We did not list all oils – only more commonly used ones. As this article and others have stated – you can use a variety of oils – but choose heart healthy ones (as noted) and still keep in mind portion control.

  • Martha

    Which oil is best for popping popcorn??

  • elay12

    I am following Dr Esselstyns program in Prevent and reverse Heart disease. Do you have any views regarding his no oil – any oil for heart patients? Specifically its effects on angina.

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      elay12 – you may want to contact Dr. Esselstyn directly – I found this online – http://www.heartattackproof.com/contact.htm . This blog is the Heart and Vascular Institute blog and our Preventive Cardiology team done not recommend no oil – they recommend the mediterranean diet and for those who want to be vegetarian, work with patients within the framework of that – http://my.clevelandclinic.org/… . This type of diet is also recommended by the American Heart Associationhttp://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/… . You should discuss your specific diet questions with your doctor or a dietitian can be very helpful. We are having a chat with Dr. Gillinov author of Heart 411 and Dr. Cho, Medical Director of our Preventive Cardiology Clinic this month if you want to participate – see http://chat.clevelandclinic.org/ Hope this helps. betsyRN

  • http://www.adlaflkjlf.com Chuck Murray

    One important note to this information. All oils should be refrigerated once open. Oil Spoils! If it’s out on the counter or open in a cabinet, it’s rancid within days.

    • The_Beating_Edge_Team

      Thanks Chuck! Jim Perko did mention to me – which I believe we are going to add to another article: Storage: Heat, light and air decrease the integrity of oils – so best to store in cool dark place. And watch how long you keep them. There is a shelf life. Thanks for bringing up this point. betsyRN

      • http://www.adlaflkjlf.com Chuck Murray

        You’re welcome. I always refrigerate after opening. I think most people have never heard that oil spoils. Also, it’s one of the biggest dangers in fast food because they use their oil over and over again reheating it each day for several days. That means their customers are eating rancid oil.