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Charis Eng, MD, PhD

Charis Eng, MD, PhD is founding chairwoman of the Genomic Medicine Institute and founding director of its Center for Personalized Genetic Healthcare. Dr. Eng is a global leader in cancer genetics and cancer genomic medicine.

How Your Genes Affect Your Reaction to Drugs

Your doctor prescribes a medication. If you have a high risk of negative side effects, do you ask for something else instead? If you know the drug won’t work well for you, do you request more options? These questions aren’t just hypothetical. They’re at the heart of pharmacogenomics. Pharmacogenomics is the study of how your … Read More

What New Rheumatoid Arthritis Research Means for You

For the 1.5 million Americans living with rheumatoid arthritis, recent research is worth watching. Answers about the genetics of this autoimmune disease have been hard to come by. But by studying genetic variations, researchers in England have started to answer important questions: Can we predict the severity of rheumatoid arthritis? Can we predict how patients … Read More

BRCA1 and Ovarian Cancer: Why Women Choose Preventive Surgery

For a woman, the decision to have your ovaries and fallopian tubes removed does not come easily. But if you face an alarmingly high genetic risk of ovarian cancer, preventive surgery may be the right choice. Angelina Jolie’s surgery in March shined a national spotlight on this issue. She previously brought attention to preventive mastectomy … Read More

Should All Women Be Screened for BRCA1 and BRCA2?

Who should be tested — and when? These are the big questions people ask when it comes to genetic screening, especially for commonly known mutations. It’s safe to say more people know about BRCA1 and BRCA2 than the average mutations. High-profile cases such as Angelina Jolie’s have brought attention to them. The actress recently announced … Read More

Can You Get Tested for Colon Cancer at Home?

Doctors stress the importance of colon cancer screening for a reason. Early detection makes a huge difference. When doctors detect the disease in early stages, five-year survival rates are as high as 70 to 97 percent. Sadly, far too many patients ignore the call for regular colonoscopies after age 50, despite the clear value of … Read More

How Your Family Affects Your Heart Health

When it comes to different types of heart disease, there are plenty of factors you can’t control — including aging and your family history. But even if you can’t turn back time, knowing about genetic issues makes a difference in how you manage, monitor and treat disease. If you dig into your family history, you’ll … Read More

Q&A: The Future of Genome Sequencing for Newborns

Your genes tell a story of health and disease risk — and they tell that story from the day you are born. With that in mind, interest in genomic sequencing for newborns is rising. In 2013, the National Institutes of Health awarded $25 million to four major research projects examining the practice. More recently, one … Read More

What You Should Know About PALB2 and Breast Cancer Risk

When a genetic mutation makes headlines, the first thing patients ask is, “Should I be tested for it?” PALB2 is no exception. Recently, researchers made news by connecting mutations in this gene to an increased risk for breast cancer. It’s important research. It expands the list of genes that we know affect breast cancer. But … Read More