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Heart & Vascular Health

Stay informed about heart, vascular and thoracic topics from our Heart & Vascular Institute, which is ranked No. 1 in heart care in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

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Congenital Heart Disease

Born with a Heart Defect? Your Life Span Can Be Normal

Tags: congenital heart defect, congenital heart disease, heart, heart and vascular institute, heart disease, heart health

More patients with congenital heart defects are living into adulthood, report two studies. While many have near-normal life spans, long-term medical care is still needed.


How Nurses Keep You Safe During Your Hospital Stay

How Nurses Keep You Safe During Your Hospital Stay

Tags: heart, heart and vascular institute, heart health, hospital stay, nurse, patient safety

During your hospitalization, nurses use technology, standardized processes and ongoing communication to deliver you the best care in the safest environment.


http://health.clevelandclinic.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/15-HHB-423-Dietary-Fats-Infographic_FINAL.pdf

Are You Eating Good Fats or Bad Fats? (Infographic)

Tags: good fat, healthy fats, heart disease, infographic, saturated fat, trans fat, Trans fats

Research has shifted experts’ opinions on which fats are heart-healthy. You'll be surprised to learn which fats you can eat more of and which you still have to avoid. 


Close up of corn on the cob with melted butter

Your Diet and Heart Disease: Rethinking Butter, Beef and Bacon

Tags: cholesterol, diet, eggs, healthy diet, heart disease, red meat, salt, saturated fat, sodium, trans fat

Is it okay to eat butter now? See what top cardiologists want you to know about what's changing in our view of diet and heart disease.


Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: When Your Heart’s Too Big

Tags: echo, electrocardiogram, HCM, heart, heart and vascular institute, heart health, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, sports, sports cardiology, sudden cardiac death

It’s generally healthy when an athlete’s heart adapts to exercise by becoming stronger, thicker, and larger. However, in some cases, a big heart can be dangerous. Learn when to worry and when not to.


A doctor listening to his patient's heartbeat with a stethoscope

Have Diabetes? Why You Need to Know Your Blood Pressure Numbers

Tags: blood pressure, diabetes, study, Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes

A new study indicates diabetics with a BP level of 140/90 need treatment to reduce that level and your risks for cardiovascular or microvascular problems.


Bergamot May Lower Cholesterol

Bergamot Extract May Lower Your Cholesterol

Tags: antioxidant, bergamot, cholesterol, dr frid, heart, heart and vascular institute, heart disease, heart health, statin, supplements

Preliminary studies show the citrus fruit bergamot may effectively lower cholesterol without the undesirable side effects of statins.


Fed up man blocking his ears from noise of wife snoring at home in bedroom

Do You Snore? How Sleep Apnea Can Hurt Your Heart

Tags: arrhythmias, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), CPAP, Headaches, heart failure, insomnia, sleep apnea, snoring

Daytime sleepiness, heavy snoring and waking abruptly and out of breath could mean you have sleep apnea. Find out how this can lead to arrhythmias and heart failure.


doctor checking female heart

How Cancer Treatments Can Damage Your Heart

Tags: ace inhibitors, arrhythmias, beta-blockers, cancer, cancer treatments, cardio-oncologist, Cardiomyopathy, dr tamarappoo, echocardiogram, heart failure, heart valves, radiation

Chemotherapy and radiation can damage your heart. A cardio-oncologist can help patients complete their cancer treatment without incurring damage to the heart.


stress test screen

Do You Really Need a Stress Test? They’re Not for Everyone

Tags: coronary artery disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, stress, stress test

Many patients who are at low risk for heart problems don’t need screenings such as EKG and stress tests, a national association of primary care physicians recently recommended.