Top 5 List for Fellowship

What fellows need to know, from a fourth-year fellow

Fellowship Top Five

After spending three years as a fellow at Cleveland Clinic, Gabriel Loor, MD, has learned a thing or two about living and working in Cleveland. Here, as part of our ongoing series he offers a handful of pointers for first-year fellows—this is his chief administrative year—so they can take advantage of the rich resources at Cleveland Clinic.

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As I see new faces, it reminds me of what I felt like when I started as a first-year fellow in Cardiac Surgery. Here are five things you should know when starting…

Gabriel Loor, MD

Gabriel Loor, MD

1. Cleveland is a great place to live and work with a family. I moved to Cleveland in July 2010 to start my cardiothoracic surgery residency. My wife moved here a month ahead of time—she was already doing some work as a staff surgeon. We have three children. My oldest son plays for the premier U9 Ohio state team in soccer, my 7-year-old daughter is an artist, and the youngest, 3, is a dancer and attends gymnastics courses in Cleveland.

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2. Starting residency. Starting residency was a bit nerve-wracking, as I did not know what to expect. Ultimately, it was a lot of fun and the transition was fairly smooth. The staff at Cleveland Clinic makes it this way to ensure excellent quality with a great learning experience.

3. Patient experiences. Every patient will touch you dearly. The care we offer patients is world class. It starts in the operating room with perfect stitches and continues in the ICU and floors with excellent patient care and communication with families. I think this aspect of the doctoring experience is just as important as anything else.

4. Teamwork. We have a broad team that we work with. Besides interns and junior residents and staff in general surgery, there are nurse practitioners, physician assistants in the operating rooms, OR schedulers, staff, critical care personnel, etc. This is what makes Cleveland Clinic special. It has enormous manpower devoted to each individual patient outcome.

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5. Research. Research opportunities are plentiful at Cleveland Clinic. I am currently working on three manuscripts—one related to hematocrit levels during cardiopulmonary bypass and the effects of transfusions on patient outcomes. The other is on our recent experience with a new bioprosthetic mitral valve. The third focuses on a quality initiative using a hemostasis checklist prior to closing patients in the OR. I am also preparing for a presentation, and I just gave a talk at the plenary session of the AATS in San Francisco. Additionally, I delivered a case report at the Helen Ross symposium at Cleveland Clinic.

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