Chat With a Doctor: Marfan Syndrome and Aorta Disease

Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2012, noon (ET)

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Ask questions and get answers about Marfan syndrome and aorta disease from Cleveland Clinic physicians during a live webchat Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, at noon (ET).

Marfan Syndrome and Aorta Disease Live Web Chat: noon to 1 p.m. (ET) on Oct. 8, 2012

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Featured Expert
Vidyasagar Kalahasti, MD

  • Staff Cardiologist
  • Section of Cardiovascular Imaging
  • Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine

Featured Expert
Lars Svensson, MD

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  • Director of the Aorta Center
  • Director of the Marfan Syndrome and Connective Tissue Disorder Clinic
  • Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery

Do you have a question about Marfan syndrome and aorta disease? Vidyasagar Kalahasti, MD, Staff Cardiologist, Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, and Lars Svensson, MD, PhD, Director of the Aorta Center, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, will answer your questions about this topic during a live webchat Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2012, at noon (ET).

Get answers to your health questions and concerns. It’s easy to be part of our live chat events, led by Cleveland Clinic doctors and health professionals.

Marfan syndrome and aorta disease

Marfan syndrome affects the connective tissue of the body and causes damage to the heart, aorta, and other parts of the body. It is caused by a gene defect and in most cases, the condition is inherited.

This complex condition requires a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and a specialized and experienced approach to care because multiple organ systems must be assessed and treated. About 90 percent of people with Marfan syndrome develop changes in their heart and blood vessels. These conditions can result in a medical emergency and in some cases are life-threatening.

Possible questions for this webchat

  • Are there early signs or signals of Marfan syndrome?
  • Are there ways to genetically test for Marfan syndrome or other diseases of the aorta?
  • If I have Marfan syndrome, what can I do to protect myself from life-threatening events?

Dr. Vidyasagar Kalahasti is a staff cardiologist in the Section of Cardiovascular Imaging and the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, at the Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute at Cleveland Clinic.

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Dr. Lars Georg Svensson is an attending surgeon and Director of the Aorta Center, Director of the Marfan Syndrome and Connective Tissue Disorder Clinic, and Director of Quality and Process Improvement in the Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery at Cleveland Clinic.

This health chat will open on Sunday, Oct. 7, 2012 to allow you to submit questions. We will try to answer as many questions as possible during the chat. Please create an account to attend the chat and submit your questions.

 

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