Researching a New Treatment for ED

Learn about erectile dysfunction (ED) and heart health

heart vascular health line art

In response to the many questions from our article, “Erectile Dysfunction May Signal Cardiovascular Problems,” Dr. Shishehbor provided additional information on current treatment and research.

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One common cause of erectile dysfunction (ED) is reduced blood supply to the penis during arousal due to blockages caused by fatty material accumulated along the artery walls.

The current therapy for ED involves the use of drugs to improve blood supply called phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE 5i). PDE 5i only succeed in about 50 percent of patients. Patients (particularly those with risk factors for or history of cardiac or vascular disease) with ED who have tried PDE 5i without much success may be considered for a vascular evaluation including an arterial ultrasound or angiography to assess blood flow to the penis.

If you suffer from ED and have tried PDE 5i (e.g. Viagra® or Cialis®) without much improvement, you may want to consider being part of a research study. In collaboration with Cleveland Clinic’s Glickman Urological & Kidney Institute, the Section of Interventional Cardiology in the Heart & Vascular Medicine Institute is conducting research studies to better understand the potential role of endovascular intervention to treat blocked arteries that supply blood to the penis.

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To learn more, please contact Daniel Shoskes, MD, of the Urological & Kidney Institute or Mehdi H. Shishehbor, DO, of the Heart & Vascular Institute. Alternatively, please send your questions via this blog or through our secure  contact us form and Mehdi H. Shishehbor, DO, will respond or direct you to the appropriate physician(s) for help.

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