What the New Pelvic Exam Guidelines Mean for You

Not every woman needs a pelvic exam every year, according to new guidelines from the American College of Physicians (ACP). However, you may want to hold off on canceling that appointment. Experts say skipping your pelvic exam could still have some unintended negative consequences on your health. The pelvic exam has important benefits, says OB/GYN … Read More

Newly Approved DNA Test for HPV Could Replace Your Pap

Most women would rather avoid a Pap test that isn’t necessary — and now they can. Recently, the FDA approved the HPV DNA test that can be used as a stand-alone test without a Pap smear. This test, which has been approved for women age 25 and older, gives your gynecologist another tool for diagnosing cervical cancer. The test … Read More

Vaccine Prevents Human Papilloma Virus (Video)

Today, HPV is the most commonly sexually transmitted disease — not only in the United States, but also in the world. Fortunately, there is an effective vaccine that can prevent HPV infection, says Habibeth Gitiforooz, MD, Cleveland Clinic OB/GYN. She talks about the risks associated with HPV and explains why it is important to receive … Read More

Head and Neck Cancers: Truth Exposed

There are many misconceptions about head and neck cancers. Below, find 4 myths debunked by our experts. Myth 1: Cigarette smoking doesn’t increase your risk of developing head and neck cancer Fact:  The risk of developing head and neck cancer is 15 times greater for smokers than non-smokers. Myth 2:  Drinking alcohol doesn’t increase your … Read More

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HPV Vaccines: Safe, Protective for Kids

If you are a parent who feels confused about vaccine safety for your child, here’s some data about the vaccines for human papillomavirus (HPV) to ease your mind.  Researchers studied both HPV vaccines in tens of thousands of people around the world. More than 46 million doses have been distributed to date, and there have been … Read More

Boys, Men and HPV: Vaccines Safe, Protective (Video)

In the United States each year, about 15,000 women and 7,000 men are affected by HPV-related cancers, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If people are vaccinated, these cancers can be prevented. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends routine vaccination for the human papillomavirus (HPV) for all males ages 9 to 26 … Read More

HPV Vaccine: Why Your Daughter Should Get One (Video)

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination protects against four types of HPV– two that cause 75 percent of cervical cancer cases and two that cause 90 percent of genital warts cases. HPV is transmitted through sexual intercourse, however it can also be transmitted through simple genital contact, oral sex, and can even be found under your … Read More

Women in Their 60s: Staying Strong and Healthy (Video)

Your 60s should see you continuing your periodic Pap smears and HPV tests, mammogram, pelvic exams and colon cancer screenings (if needed), advises Holly L. Thacker, MD. You should have had your shingles vaccine by age 60, and by 65 you need the pneumonia vaccine and a bone density scan. Check your senses: are you having regular hearing and eye exams? You should!

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Women in Their 40s: Going Through Those Changes (Video)

Holly L. Thacker, MD, discusses perimenopause, the time in your 40s where you go through many hormonal fluctuations. These can lead to very heavy or skipped periods. You don’t have to suffer from these — there are many treatment options. In your 40s we still do periodic Pap smears and HPV tests, and add other screenings, including diabetes, cholesterol and thyroid, to keep you healthy.

Women in Their 30s: Key Tests and Screenings (Video)

For your 30s, Holly L. Thacker, MD discusses the addition of another test to your Pap smear screenings: the HPV test. Depending on your HPV status, we can extend the time for your Paps to every five years rather than every three. But you’ll still need to see a women’s health physician every year, even if you don’t need a Pap. Fertility begins to decrease during this period of your life, so it’s important to talk about your childbearing plans with your doctor.