Mold: What You Need to Know to Cut Your Risk

It can be found anywhere – on shower curtains, house siding or tree trunks. It grows in almost any color, and it thrives in damp, warm, humid places, sprouting up year-round. It’s mold, and if you’re exposed to it, you could develop breathing problems, from mild to severe. According to critical care pulmonologist Lamia Ibrahim, … Read More

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Could a Blood Test Someday Diagnose Lung Cancer?

Doctors someday might diagnose lung cancer through a simple blood test – which would enable detection of the disease at an earlier stage and could result in more effective treatment.  Such a blood test could be the ultimate result of new research that found people with non-small cell lung cancer have different chemicals in their blood called metabolites than people who … Read More

Don’t Smoke? You Could Still Get Lung Cancer

If you think you’re safe from lung cancer because you’ve never smoked, think again. Being a non-smoker doesn’t mean you cannot get lung cancer. While cigarette smoking is the No. 1 cause of lung cancer, you also can get it from breathing secondhand smoke, being exposed to asbestos or radon, or having a family history of lung cancer. Many … Read More

Tiny Coils Help COPD Patients to Breathe Easier

Doctors and researchers are testing a new procedure that doesn’t involve surgery to help patients with a devastating lung disease called chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD, which encompasses a group of conditions, is permanent lung damage that gets worse over time. The two most prevalent forms of COPD are chronic bronchitis and emphysema. People with … Read More

New Standard Lung Screening Could Save Your Life

Lung cancer kills more people in the United States than breast, prostate, colorectal and pancreatic cancers combined. However, there’s a new recommendation that can reduce deaths among high-risk patients by as much as 20 percent: annual low-dose computed tomography (CT) scans. “These low-dose CT scans have become the standard of care quite recently,” says Peter Mazzone, … Read More

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