Rhythm Disorders

Stay informed about heart, vascular and thoracic topics in this continuation of The Beating Edge blog from our Heart & Vascular Institute, which is ranked No. 1 in heart care in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

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Fast and furious heart rhythm

Atrial Fibrillation: When the Electrical System Misfires (Video)

Tags: abnormal heart beat, arrhythmia, Dr. Tchou, electrophysiology, heart and vascular institute, heart video, video, whiteboard sessions

Atrial fibrillation, also called AFib, is the most common irregular heart rhythm. Our heart is powered by a complex electrical system, and sometimes it misfires – which causes a fast, chaotic rhythm that can be alarming. Learn more.

Sign saying Weak Bridge

Rhythm of Your Heart: Bridge Out Ahead (Video)

Tags: abnormal heart beat, Dr. Tchou, electrophysiology, heart video, video, whiteboard sessions

People who experience a certain type of abnormal heart rhythm sometimes can see their beats per minute rise from a normal of 70 to up to 250. This occurs when there are issues with the “bridge” that connects the heart’s “circuits.”

stethoscope with heart

Some Game Changers in New AFib Guidelines

Tags: afib, atrial fibrillation, heart and vascular institute, heart health, heart rhythm

There are some game changers in new guidelines for best treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common type of heart rhythm disorder. AF is a factor in thousands of deaths each year. See what's new.

Flat line alert on heart monitor

The Ins and Outs of Irregular Heartbeats (Video)

Tags: abnormal heart beat, Dr. Tchou, electrophysiology, heart and vascular institute, heart video, video, whiteboard sessions

Your heart has its own “electrical system,” which powers the beating of your heart. The heart’s natural pacemaker regulates your heart’s rhythm, unless something irregular — called an arrhythmia — occurs.

Rhythm of your heart

The Ups and Downs of Your Heart Rhythms (Video)

Tags: Dr. Tchou, electrophysiology, heart and vascular institute, heart beat, heart electrical impulses, heart video, video, whiteboard sessions

You’ve surely noticed how your heart rate increases when you exercise and slows down at rest—but most of us don’t think about how or why this happens. The answers may surprise you.

Electrical System of the Heart

Your Heart is a Human Electrical System (Video)

Tags: blood pumping, circulatory system, Dr. Tchou, heart and vascular institute, heart electrical system, heart health, heart video, video, whiteboard sessions

The beating of your heart is something you may take for granted—until something goes wrong. Like all muscles, the heart conducts electrical impulses, which keep your blood pumping.

Slow or Rapid Heartbeat-What You Need to Know

Do You Have a Slow or Racing Heartbeat?

Tags: abnormal heart beat, arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation, cardioversion, heart and vascular institute, heart beat, heart health

Each day we take for granted that our hearts will continue efficiently beating oxygen-rich blood to our organs. But a slow or rapid heartbeat—called bradycardia and tachycardia—can cause serious functional problems.

human heart

Patient Receives New, Leadless Pacemaker

Tags: abnormal heart beat, heart health, innovation, pacemaker

A Cleveland Clinic patient with a slowed heartbeat is the third in the nation to receive the device as part of an international, multicenter clinical trial testing its safety and efficacy for FDA approval.

scale with feet

Extra Pounds Can Make Your Heart Pound

Tags: atrial fibrillation, exercise, healthy diet, heart and vascular institute, heart health, weight loss

Losing weight can be the best medicine for your heart, says a new study that found that weight loss helps lessen symptoms of atrial fibrillation, such as a racing, erratic heartbeat. Get more details.

hand clutching chest

Consider Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation Again

Tags: ablation, atrial fibrillation

Don't lose hope if you have recurrent atrial fibrillation, weeks, months, or even years after you have had a pulmonary vein ablation. A repeat procedure can help you regain control over your heartbeat.